"That's the strange regalia of souls. Vibrant / as platinum filaments they went, / like arteries through their darkness." - Rilke
photogmundane:

 Alexander Gronsky

photogmundane:

 Alexander Gronsky

girlinbk:

A book completely covered with graphite, designed to remain in a public library in the “how to draw” section

girlinbk:

A book completely covered with graphite, designed to remain in a public library in the “how to draw” section

fleurdulys:

Lunar Landscape with a Cloudy Sky - Adalbert Stifter

fleurdulys:

Lunar Landscape with a Cloudy Sky - Adalbert Stifter

qock:

Me in front of ‘Man and Animals’ (1949) by Karel Appel

qock:

Me in front of ‘Man and Animals’ (1949) by Karel Appel

catmota:

The Arrival of Light
Alfredo Da Silva  (b. 1935)

catmota:

The Arrival of Light

Alfredo Da Silva  (b. 1935)

likeafieldmouse:

Allison Schulnik

likeafieldmouse:

Allison Schulnik

bustakay:

globalwarmist:

Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.
- Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”

The mural as a crucial form of political expression (see Rivera), relate to the wall which is attacked by graffiti, the wall whose social relations are made to sing out, to scream out, and announce themselves from concrete.

bustakay:

globalwarmist:

Earlier this year, London’s Tate Modern acquired “Sabra and Shatila Massacre” (1982-83), an epic mural-sized drawing by pioneering Iraqi artist Dia al-Azzawi. Sprawling as it is towering and engulfing, the artist began the massive work after news surfaced that between two and three thousand Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were strategically murdered in and around the refugee camps of southern Beirut in 1982. While creating “Sabra and Shatila Massacre,” al-Azzawi was also moved by Jean Genet’s “Four Hours in Shatila,” a written dispatch of the hell on earth that was the site of this civil-war era carnage, the violent details of which are impossible to take in without periodically searching for respite by turning away from the page.

- Dia al-Azzawi’s “Sabra and Shatila Massacre”

The mural as a crucial form of political expression (see Rivera), relate to the wall which is attacked by graffiti, the wall whose social relations are made to sing out, to scream out, and announce themselves from concrete.

fleurdulys:

Winter Evening - Ruskin Spear
~1911

fleurdulys:

Winter Evening - Ruskin Spear

~1911

zax72:

New painting wip #art #artist #paint #painting #oil #oilpainting #surrealism #surreal #surrealart #beksinski #salvadordali #colors #contemporaryart #wip #workinprogress #work #body #figure #figurative #girl #bestdm

zax72:

New painting wip #art #artist #paint #painting #oil #oilpainting #surrealism #surreal #surrealart #beksinski #salvadordali #colors #contemporaryart #wip #workinprogress #work #body #figure #figurative #girl #bestdm

wrk-kevintownsend:

KEVIN TOWNSEND
a shadow too heavy to drag behind me
a drawing made by erasing, in which the debris left behind constitutes the finished work

42 hour durational drawing performance
completed in 7, 6 hour shifts over the course of 1 week—
documentation images above were taken at the end of each shift and are presented in reverse chronological order.

  • powdered graphite is buffed and burnished on a 7’ x 8’ section of wall over the course of 6 hours
  • each subsequent 6 hour session is spent methodically removing the burnished graphite from the wall surface using white plastic erasers
  • at the end of each 6 hour session a documentation image is taken
  • all eraser shavings are preserved, as they are the drawing
  • the shavings are a physical quantification of time—
    each shard is embedded with the graphite that was once on the wall
    and the physical exertion required to remove it

blastedheath:

Ian Francis (British, b.1979), Red Forest, 2009. Charcoal, acrylic, oil, ink, pen, and photo transfer on canvas, 127 x 92 cm.

blastedheath:

Ian Francis (British, b.1979), Red Forest, 2009. Charcoal, acrylic, oil, ink, pen, and photo transfer on canvas, 127 x 92 cm.

styleandthefamilytunes:

Robert Rauschenberg, White Stone in Black

styleandthefamilytunes:

Robert Rauschenberg, White Stone in Black

catmota:

The Lone Tenement  (1909)
George Wesley Bellows 

catmota:

The Lone Tenement  (1909)

George Wesley Bellows 


Kymia NawabiFinger Nailin Hay In, 2007-2008 acrylic, acrylic ink, charcoal, conte, sparkle sticker, watercolor, watercolor pen on paper 78 x 108 in.
Kymia Nawabi
Finger Nailin Hay In, 2007-2008
acrylic, acrylic ink, charcoal, conte, sparkle sticker, watercolor, watercolor pen on paper
78 x 108 in.

hauntedgardenbook:

Max Ernst. “Nature at Dawn (Evensong),” 1938. Oil on canvas, 81 x 100 cm. Private collection. © 2013, ProLitteris, Zurich

hauntedgardenbook:

Max Ernst. “Nature at Dawn (Evensong),” 1938. Oil on canvas, 81 x 100 cm. Private collection. © 2013, ProLitteris, Zurich